Do you want to have more say in health research?

Involvement opportunity – CAPC Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPI&E) members needed in Bristol

Primary Care is healthcare in the community – everything from GPs to Pharmacists, Optometrists to Dentists. The Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) aim to gather evidence to help decide what will make primary care better for everyone.

Since their goal is improving care for everyone, it’s best that everyone is involved.


How to get involved

You can get involved in the research in a number of ways:

  • help select research that is important and relevant
  • help researchers design their projects
  • help develop understandable information sheets for people taking part in research
  • join a research management or advisory group
  • help interpret the results of the research
  • help make sure the research is reported in understandable ways
  • help make sure good research is heard about.

Who: 

People with an interest in healthcare research, public involvement in research. CAPC are looking for people who are passionate about involving patients, carers and the public in primary care research (the first port of call in the healthcare system – for most people a GP).

Experience of a similar role is not needed and any necessary training will be given.

Where: 

Meetings are held either at CAPC (local travel is reimbursed) or somewhere which is convenient for you.

Payment:

CAPC PPI&E contributors are paid £15-20 per hour depending on the tasks required, plus £15 for pre-meeting preparation or paperwork between meetings.

More info: 

Please contact the CAPC PPI&E coordinators, Victoria Wilson and Julie Clayton capc-ppi@bristol.ac.uk 0117 331 4555 University of Bristol, Centre for Academic Primary Care, Canynge Hall, Whatley Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2PS

Please share and like us on social media:

Making Change Happen March 2019 drop-in dates

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is our new peer support project run by and for Disabled and older residents in Bristol. The project will set up four new groups across Bristol and each group will meet once a month. The aim is to spread the four monthly meet-ups so that, in one area or another, there is a meet up almost every week. 

The groups are open to Disabled people, older people and people living with mental distress or physical health difficulties. People who are isolated or feel left out are especially welcome . We hope the groups will give people a chance to meet and talk about the issues that affect them and how they can work together to make change happen in their area of Bristol.

Please join us at one of our meet ups this March:

South Bristol

Friday 22nd March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Café, Gatehouse Centre, Hareclive Road, Bristol BS13 9JN

Central and West Bristol

Wednesday 27th March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Watershed Café, Harbourside, Bristol BS1 5TX

North Bristol

Thursday 28th March

11.30 am till 1.30pm

Henbury & Brentry Community Centre, Machin Road, Bristol BS10 7HG

The project is funded by The People’s Health Trust Active Communities Programme and all groups are free to attend. Just drop by, or for more information please contact us:

E-mail:            mike.bristoldef@gmail.com

Tel:           0117 914 0528        

Please share and like us on social media:

Next Stage disabled musicians survey

Picture of band 'Holy Moly and the crackers'

Are you a musician, artist or DJ producing original music, with the ambition to focus on your creativity and take your project forward?

Do you personally identify as a Deaf or disabled person, or don’t identify, but have a health condition or impairment that impacts your daily life?

If the answer to these two questions is “yes”, then this is your opportunity to share your experiences andchange the music industry.

The survey gives you the chance to share your music with Attitude is Everything, join a new artist network, and share your experiences of:


 Rehearsing
 Recording
 Playing live
 Seeking support and funding
 Networking and engaging with the music industry
 Talking about your lived experience as a musician or artist

It should take around 5-10 minutes to complete this survey, if you want to take a break you can save your answers and come back to it later.

The findings of this survey will be shared at The Great Escape in May 2019.

Complete the Next Stage Artist Survey here

If you require this survey in an alternative format, or need guidance on how to complete it, please contact rich@attitudeiseverything.org.uk.

**Survey closes March 10**

Please share and like us on social media:

Check out these books by or about Deaf and Disabled people on World Book Day!

Deaf and Disabled people are often not well represented in literature. Earlier this year, the Merton Centre for Independent Living made an effort ahead of World Book Day to crowd-source a list of books by or about Deaf and Disabled people.

Check out the list their members and supporters came up with here.

Are there any books you think should be added to the list? You can send your suggestions to info@mertoncil.org.uk or tweet them @MertonCIL

Please share and like us on social media:

Disability News Service News Feb 28 2019

Government announces plans for extension of personal health budgets

The government wants to increase the number of people who use personal health budgets (PHBs) to choose their own health and social care support from 40,000 to as many as 200,000 over the next five years.

It has approved extending legal rights to PHBs to disabled people eligible for funding from NHS wheelchair services, and those eligible for aftercare services under section 117 of the Mental Health Act.

But it also signalled that these rights would eventually be extended to other groups, including people with ongoing social care needs who also make regular and continuing use of particular NHS services; people leaving the armed services who are eligible for ongoing NHS services; and autistic people and those with learning difficulties who are eligible for ongoing NHS care.

Read the full article here.

Katherine Araniello: Tributes to ‘force of nature’ and ‘creative genius’

Disabled artists and activists are mourning the death of Katherine Araniello, a “force of nature” who leaves behind a “hugely significant” disability arts legacy.

Araniello was a performance and video artist who used satire and subversive humour at the expense of “dehumanising and patronising” targets such as disability charities, the Paralympics and media representation of disabled people.

Tony Heaton, chair and former chief executive of Shape Arts, said Araniello was “an original and independent thinker” with a “wicked sense of humour and irony”, and her death was a “huge and devastating loss”. 

Read the full article here.

Concerns over growing number of ‘dangerous and discriminatory’ road layouts

Increasing numbers of local authorities are breaching the Equality Act by designing “dangerous and discriminatory” road layouts that put blind and partially-sighted people at risk of serious harm, say disabled campaigners.

The concerns have been raised by the user-led campaign group National Federation of the Blind of the UK (NFB UK), which has grown increasingly concerned by schemes being introduced across the country.

Among those councils it has highlighted are Manchester City Council, Leicester City Council, and Enfield council in north London.

Read the full article here.

Government is failing on disabled women’s rights, UN is told

Activists have told a UN committee how the UK government is failing to address the significant barriers and human rights violations faced by disabled women in accessing social security, justice, jobs and health services.

Eleanor Lisney and Rachel O’Brien, from the disabled women’s collective Sisters of Frida, were among UK women’s rights campaigners in Geneva this week to brief a UN committee of women’s rights experts.

The committee was examining the UK on its progress in implementing the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW).

Read the full article here.

DWP failed for years to meet legal duties on accessible information, says judge

he Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) failed for years to comply with its legal duties under the Equality Act by refusing to provide an accessible way for many disabled people to communicate with its staff about their benefits, a judge has ruled.

Judge Jeremy Johnson said in a high court ruling that DWP’s “systemic” failings pre-dated the Equality Act, which became law in 2010, and meant that some disabled people had been deprived of “essential” benefits.

His written judgment also revealed that DWP admitted that its creaking IT systems that deal with employment and support allowance (ESA) claims were not fit for purpose but that it was not worth spending £750,000 updating them because of the continuing roll out of universal credit, which has a new IT system.

Read the full article here.

Discrimination faced by disabled DWP staff leaps by half in four years

The proportion of Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) staff who say they have been victims of disability discrimination at work in the previous 12 months has risen by about 50 per cent in just four years, Civil Service figures have revealed.

The annual Civil Service People Survey shows the number of DWP staff saying they had personally experienced disability discrimination at work in the past 12 months rose by 150 (more than 10 per cent), from 1,462 in 2017 to 1,612 in 2018.

And the proportion of all DWP staff reporting disability discrimination rose by about 12 per cent, from about 2.55 per cent of all employees in 2017 to about 2.85 per cent in the 2018 survey.

Read the full article here.

Please share and like us on social media:

New Rough Guide to Accessible Britain

Packed with over 180 reviews of accessible and inspiring days out, there’s something for everyone in theRough Guide to Accessible Britain. The Guide aims to inspire and support people with diverse needs in enjoying the best of Britain’s attractions – whatever their disability.

The perfect tool for Motability Scheme customers wanting to explore the UK, the revamped Rough Guide to Accessible Britain is free to download or view online.

Now in its 10th year, the Guide is an ideal planning tool for anyone with access needs and now also includes information for visitors with more hidden conditions such as autism or mental illness. Every venue in the Guide is reviewed by Rough Guides’ team of writers, who either have a disability themselves or visited the venue with disabled friend or family member.

The Guide provides clear and helpful advice to highlight the very best inclusive and accessible days out for people of all abilities, from museums and art galleries, to wildlife parks and gardens.

View the Guide online.

Download your free Guide.

Please share and like us on social media: