Making Change Happen March 2019 drop-in dates

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is our new peer support project run by and for Disabled and older residents in Bristol. The project will set up four new groups across Bristol and each group will meet once a month. The aim is to spread the four monthly meet-ups so that, in one area or another, there is a meet up almost every week. 

The groups are open to Disabled people, older people and people living with mental distress or physical health difficulties. People who are isolated or feel left out are especially welcome . We hope the groups will give people a chance to meet and talk about the issues that affect them and how they can work together to make change happen in their area of Bristol.

Please join us at one of our meet ups this March:

South Bristol

Friday 22nd March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Café, Gatehouse Centre, Hareclive Road, Bristol BS13 9JN

Central and West Bristol

Wednesday 27th March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Watershed Café, Harbourside, Bristol BS1 5TX

North Bristol

Thursday 28th March

11.30 am till 1.30pm

Henbury & Brentry Community Centre, Machin Road, Bristol BS10 7HG

The project is funded by The People’s Health Trust Active Communities Programme and all groups are free to attend. Just drop by, or for more information please contact us:

E-mail:            mike.bristoldef@gmail.com

Tel:           0117 914 0528        

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Making Change Happen Drop-in, North Bristol

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is The Forum’s new peer-support project led by Disabled and older residents.

The groups are open to anyone who identifies as Disabled or is an elder with impairments, and considers themselves to be on a low income.

We are holding some drop-ins in February 2019 so that you can:

  • Find out more about the project
  • Meet people and share your ideas
  • Have your say on the issues that matter to you
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The EnAble Fund for Elected Office

Following a campaign by the cross-party group More United , the EnAble Fund for Elected Office was launched on 3rd December 2018, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

The Fund is provided by the Government Equalities Office and is administered by Disability Rights UK. It is intended to cover the additional financial costs associated with a disability, that would otherwise prevent someone from seeking elected office.

To apply for the Fund you must have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on your ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

You must also have a genuine intention to seek elected office, for an election that takes place during the timescale of the fund. These will include Local Government Elections in May 2109 and Police and Crime Commissioner Elections in May 2020.

You can find out more about the Fund here.

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Survey on UC for Disabled people and people with long term health conditions

The Disability Benefits Consortium (DBC) has launched a Universal Credit survey so that they can find out more about the experiences of Disabled people and people with long term health conditions

If you have applied for Universal Credit or tried to apply – the DBC want to hear from you.

You can take the online survey here.

The survey should take up to 20 minutes to complete and the results will be completely anonymous. This means your name will not appear in any reports produced by the DBC.

Please share your experiences with Universal Credit and add your voice thousands of other disabled people and people with long-term health conditions so the DBC can lobby the government and campaign for a fairer benefits system.

If you would like the survey in an alternative format or would like to complete it over the phone please contact the DBC here.

The survey closes end of February 2019.

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Want to Start a Career in Broadcast Journalism?

Breaking into News is an initiative run by Media Trust, in partnership with ITV News to discover diverse new talent and identify top broadcast journalists of the future.

The competition, now in its eighth year, offers aspiring journalists with limited journalism experience from across England, Wales and Northern Ireland the opportunity to create a local news report with support and advice from experienced journalists working in ten of ITV’s regional newsroom

Disabled people are the most under-represented minority group in broadcasting, according to a provisional report by Diamond, a project set up by the major broadcasters to monitor diversity in the industry. This is why, as members of the ITV West Country Diversity Panel, we would like to strongly encourage our members and any other Disabled people who are interested in a career in broadcast journalism to enter ITV’s Breaking into News competition.

Representation matters; we need Disabled people in the media to tell our stories and highlight the issues that we face. The video below is from one of last year’s winners, Steven Portman, reporting on the barriers Disabled people face when looking for employment.

If you have been dreaming of a career in broadcast journalism and you would like to report on the issues that matter to you, apply here by Friday 5 April 2019.

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Making Change Happen Drop-in, Lockleaze

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is The Forum’s new peer-support project led by Disabled and older residents.

The groups are open to anyone who identifies as Disabled or is an elder with impairments, and considers themselves to be on a low income.

We are holding some drop-ins in February 2019 so that you can:

  • Find out more about the project
  • Meet people and share your ideas
  • Have your say on the issues that matter to you
Please share and like us on social media:

Making Change Happen, East Bristol

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is The Forum’s new peer-support project led by Disabled and older residents.

The groups are open to anyone who identifies as Disabled or is an elder with impairments, and considers themselves to be on a low income.

We are holding some drop-ins in January 2019 so that you can:

  • Find out more about the project
  • Meet people and share your ideas
  • Have your say on the issues that matter to you
Please share and like us on social media:

Making Change Happen Drop-in, North Bristol

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is The Forum’s new peer-support project led by Disabled and older residents.

The groups are open to anyone who identifies as Disabled or is an elder with impairments, and considers themselves to be on a low income.

We are holding some drop-ins in January 2019 so that you can:

  • Find out more about the project
  • Meet people and share your ideas
  • Have your say on the issues that matter to you
Please share and like us on social media:

EU-UK Deal Doesn’t Help Disabled EU Citizens and Carers

Picture of the EU flag flying outside a building

A Disabled people’s organisation has warned that the proposals for who can stay in the UK after Brexit completely ignores Disabled people and their family carers.

Disire — the Disabled people’s organisation (DPO) of Disabled UK residents from other countries  — made the following statement about the recent EU-UK Joint Report :

“For Disabled EU citizens and carers, the EU-UK deal is a disappointment.  Not all Disabled people are able to work, or work enough, and so they sometimes do not meet the criteria for permanent residence.  Carers of Disabled people, who care for their (often British) relatives also cannot apply for a permanent residence card because the Home Office does not consider them to be “working”.

“The newly proposed settled status is still based on the criteria of exercising the EU treaty rights.  (This means) People who want to apply must show they have worked, have been self-employed, have studied or have been self-sufficient for five years.

“Disire believes that Disabled people and carers play a vital role in Britain and should not be prevented from getting permanent residence or settled status.  Theresa May has promised not to split up families.  Disabled people have families too.  Disabled people and carers must not be left behind when developing a new status for EU citizens.

“Disire is disappointed that the EU-UK deal does not mention of Disabled people and carers or other suppressed groups who cannot and will not fulfil the criteria for the proposed settled status.

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

“We ask the European Union negotiators and the UK government to urgently ensure that any new arrangements regarding the right to stay in the UK for EEA citizens does not discriminate against Disabled people, their families and carers.

“Any new arrangements and rights must have Disabled people and their families in mind.  That means any new status, rights or arrangements need to have provisions for Disabled people who cannot fulfil the requirements due to their impairment, illness or condition.

“If necessary, people with carers’ duties must also have provisions made for them if these duties prevent them from meeting the requirements. These provisions are important to meet the legal requirements of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the UK Equality Act 2010 and other laws.” 

(Disire, December 2017)

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