Do you want to have more say in health research?

Involvement opportunity – CAPC Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPI&E) members needed in Bristol

Primary Care is healthcare in the community – everything from GPs to Pharmacists, Optometrists to Dentists. The Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) aim to gather evidence to help decide what will make primary care better for everyone.

Since their goal is improving care for everyone, it’s best that everyone is involved.


How to get involved

You can get involved in the research in a number of ways:

  • help select research that is important and relevant
  • help researchers design their projects
  • help develop understandable information sheets for people taking part in research
  • join a research management or advisory group
  • help interpret the results of the research
  • help make sure the research is reported in understandable ways
  • help make sure good research is heard about.

Who: 

People with an interest in healthcare research, public involvement in research. CAPC are looking for people who are passionate about involving patients, carers and the public in primary care research (the first port of call in the healthcare system – for most people a GP).

Experience of a similar role is not needed and any necessary training will be given.

Where: 

Meetings are held either at CAPC (local travel is reimbursed) or somewhere which is convenient for you.

Payment:

CAPC PPI&E contributors are paid £15-20 per hour depending on the tasks required, plus £15 for pre-meeting preparation or paperwork between meetings.

More info: 

Please contact the CAPC PPI&E coordinators, Victoria Wilson and Julie Clayton capc-ppi@bristol.ac.uk 0117 331 4555 University of Bristol, Centre for Academic Primary Care, Canynge Hall, Whatley Road, Clifton, Bristol, BS8 2PS

Making Change Happen March 2019 drop-in dates

Making Change Happen logo with coffee cups

Making Change Happen is our new peer support project run by and for Disabled and older residents in Bristol. The project will set up four new groups across Bristol and each group will meet once a month. The aim is to spread the four monthly meet-ups so that, in one area or another, there is a meet up almost every week. 

The groups are open to Disabled people, older people and people living with mental distress or physical health difficulties. People who are isolated or feel left out are especially welcome . We hope the groups will give people a chance to meet and talk about the issues that affect them and how they can work together to make change happen in their area of Bristol.

Please join us at one of our meet ups this March:

South Bristol

Friday 22nd March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Café, Gatehouse Centre, Hareclive Road, Bristol BS13 9JN

Central and West Bristol

Wednesday 27th March

10.30 am till 12. 30pm

The Watershed Café, Harbourside, Bristol BS1 5TX

North Bristol

Thursday 28th March

11.30 am till 1.30pm

Henbury & Brentry Community Centre, Machin Road, Bristol BS10 7HG

The project is funded by The People’s Health Trust Active Communities Programme and all groups are free to attend. Just drop by, or for more information please contact us:

E-mail:            mike.bristoldef@gmail.com

Tel:           0117 914 0528        

Next Stage disabled musicians survey

Picture of band 'Holy Moly and the crackers'

Are you a musician, artist or DJ producing original music, with the ambition to focus on your creativity and take your project forward?

Do you personally identify as a Deaf or disabled person, or don’t identify, but have a health condition or impairment that impacts your daily life?

If the answer to these two questions is “yes”, then this is your opportunity to share your experiences andchange the music industry.

The survey gives you the chance to share your music with Attitude is Everything, join a new artist network, and share your experiences of:


 Rehearsing
 Recording
 Playing live
 Seeking support and funding
 Networking and engaging with the music industry
 Talking about your lived experience as a musician or artist

It should take around 5-10 minutes to complete this survey, if you want to take a break you can save your answers and come back to it later.

The findings of this survey will be shared at The Great Escape in May 2019.

Complete the Next Stage Artist Survey here

If you require this survey in an alternative format, or need guidance on how to complete it, please contact rich@attitudeiseverything.org.uk.

**Survey closes March 10**

Check out these books by or about Deaf and Disabled people on World Book Day!

Deaf and Disabled people are often not well represented in literature. Earlier this year, the Merton Centre for Independent Living made an effort ahead of World Book Day to crowd-source a list of books by or about Deaf and Disabled people.

Check out the list their members and supporters came up with here.

Are there any books you think should be added to the list? You can send your suggestions to info@mertoncil.org.uk or tweet them @MertonCIL

Disability News Service News Feb 28 2019

Government announces plans for extension of personal health budgets

The government wants to increase the number of people who use personal health budgets (PHBs) to choose their own health and social care support from 40,000 to as many as 200,000 over the next five years.

It has approved extending legal rights to PHBs to disabled people eligible for funding from NHS wheelchair services, and those eligible for aftercare services under section 117 of the Mental Health Act.

But it also signalled that these rights would eventually be extended to other groups, including people with ongoing social care needs who also make regular and continuing use of particular NHS services; people leaving the armed services who are eligible for ongoing NHS services; and autistic people and those with learning difficulties who are eligible for ongoing NHS care.

Read the full article here.

Katherine Araniello: Tributes to ‘force of nature’ and ‘creative genius’

Disabled artists and activists are mourning the death of Katherine Araniello, a “force of nature” who leaves behind a “hugely significant” disability arts legacy.

Araniello was a performance and video artist who used satire and subversive humour at the expense of “dehumanising and patronising” targets such as disability charities, the Paralympics and media representation of disabled people.

Tony Heaton, chair and former chief executive of Shape Arts, said Araniello was “an original and independent thinker” with a “wicked sense of humour and irony”, and her death was a “huge and devastating loss”. 

Read the full article here.

Concerns over growing number of ‘dangerous and discriminatory’ road layouts

Increasing numbers of local authorities are breaching the Equality Act by designing “dangerous and discriminatory” road layouts that put blind and partially-sighted people at risk of serious harm, say disabled campaigners.

The concerns have been raised by the user-led campaign group National Federation of the Blind of the UK (NFB UK), which has grown increasingly concerned by schemes being introduced across the country.

Among those councils it has highlighted are Manchester City Council, Leicester City Council, and Enfield council in north London.

Read the full article here.

Government is failing on disabled women’s rights, UN is told

Activists have told a UN committee how the UK government is failing to address the significant barriers and human rights violations faced by disabled women in accessing social security, justice, jobs and health services.

Eleanor Lisney and Rachel O’Brien, from the disabled women’s collective Sisters of Frida, were among UK women’s rights campaigners in Geneva this week to brief a UN committee of women’s rights experts.

The committee was examining the UK on its progress in implementing the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW).

Read the full article here.

DWP failed for years to meet legal duties on accessible information, says judge

he Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) failed for years to comply with its legal duties under the Equality Act by refusing to provide an accessible way for many disabled people to communicate with its staff about their benefits, a judge has ruled.

Judge Jeremy Johnson said in a high court ruling that DWP’s “systemic” failings pre-dated the Equality Act, which became law in 2010, and meant that some disabled people had been deprived of “essential” benefits.

His written judgment also revealed that DWP admitted that its creaking IT systems that deal with employment and support allowance (ESA) claims were not fit for purpose but that it was not worth spending £750,000 updating them because of the continuing roll out of universal credit, which has a new IT system.

Read the full article here.

Discrimination faced by disabled DWP staff leaps by half in four years

The proportion of Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) staff who say they have been victims of disability discrimination at work in the previous 12 months has risen by about 50 per cent in just four years, Civil Service figures have revealed.

The annual Civil Service People Survey shows the number of DWP staff saying they had personally experienced disability discrimination at work in the past 12 months rose by 150 (more than 10 per cent), from 1,462 in 2017 to 1,612 in 2018.

And the proportion of all DWP staff reporting disability discrimination rose by about 12 per cent, from about 2.55 per cent of all employees in 2017 to about 2.85 per cent in the 2018 survey.

Read the full article here.

New Rough Guide to Accessible Britain

Packed with over 180 reviews of accessible and inspiring days out, there’s something for everyone in theRough Guide to Accessible Britain. The Guide aims to inspire and support people with diverse needs in enjoying the best of Britain’s attractions – whatever their disability.

The perfect tool for Motability Scheme customers wanting to explore the UK, the revamped Rough Guide to Accessible Britain is free to download or view online.

Now in its 10th year, the Guide is an ideal planning tool for anyone with access needs and now also includes information for visitors with more hidden conditions such as autism or mental illness. Every venue in the Guide is reviewed by Rough Guides’ team of writers, who either have a disability themselves or visited the venue with disabled friend or family member.

The Guide provides clear and helpful advice to highlight the very best inclusive and accessible days out for people of all abilities, from museums and art galleries, to wildlife parks and gardens.

View the Guide online.

Download your free Guide.

The EnAble Fund for Elected Office

Following a campaign by the cross-party group More United , the EnAble Fund for Elected Office was launched on 3rd December 2018, the International Day of Persons with Disabilities.

The Fund is provided by the Government Equalities Office and is administered by Disability Rights UK. It is intended to cover the additional financial costs associated with a disability, that would otherwise prevent someone from seeking elected office.

To apply for the Fund you must have a physical or mental impairment that has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on your ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.

You must also have a genuine intention to seek elected office, for an election that takes place during the timescale of the fund. These will include Local Government Elections in May 2109 and Police and Crime Commissioner Elections in May 2020.

You can find out more about the Fund here.

Disability News Service News 21st Feb

Long-awaited Newton meeting confirms confusion over DPO engagement

Disabled people’s organisations (DPOs) have raised ongoing concerns about the government’s failure to comply with basic principles of the UN disability convention at a long-awaited meeting with the minister for disabled people.

Representatives of six of the UK’s leading DPOs met with minister for disabled people Sarah Newton and senior civil servants last week to discuss the government’s track record on engaging with disabled people and their user-led organisations.

It was the first time that Newton (pictured) had met with the group of DPOs – members of the UK CRPD Monitoring Coalition of Disabled People’s Organisations – since she took up her post in late 2017.

Read the full article here.

Council told to improve disability equality training after councillor’s ‘ignorant’ attacknull

A disabled politician has described the equality training given to fellow councillors as “a joke” after a Liberal Democrat rival was forced to apologise for posting a message on social media that accused him of using his impairment for political purposes.

The comments by Lib Dem Joe Naitta were targeted last June at fellow Derby city councillor Amo Raju, who is a Labour party member and also chief executive of the user-led organisation Disability Direct.

Naitta said in a Facebook post to his supporters: “This one uses his disability, get rid of labour in Blagreaves ward.”

Read the full article here.

Disabled residents play ground-breaking co-production role in major development

Disabled people have played a “ground-breaking” role in co-producing a major new redevelopment scheme.

The role played by disabled people in the planning application to redevelop Hammersmith town hall and the surrounding area in London is the first major product of a pioneering agreement to embed a genuine culture of co-production within Hammersmith and Fulham council.

A report last year by the Hammersmith and Fulham Disabled People’s Commission (pictured, the report’s launch) was accepted in full by the council and hailed as a blueprint for disabled people’s organisations across the country to push for change from their own local authorities.

Read the full article here.

Watchdogs’ comments boost hopes for rail access improvements

Powerful warnings from two watchdogs about the barriers faced by disabled passengers have been welcomed as a “wonderful step in re-instating access to rail for all” by a leading accessible transport expert.

One of the two watchdogs, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), warned the government and train operating companies that two major elements of the rail system could be discriminating against disabled passengers.

In a letter to MPs on the Commons transport select committee, EHRC chair David Isaac says the commission is concerned about the impact of “ongoing transport policies”, particularly the move towards running more trains without a member of customer services staff on board – driver-only operated (DOO) trains – and an increase in unstaffed stations.

Read the full article here.

Call for urgent probe into police passing DWP information about protesters

There are growing concerns and calls for an urgent investigation into admissions by two police forces that they have shared information about protesters with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP).

Both Lancashire and Greater Manchester police forces have now admitted passing on information to DWP about people taking part in protests.

The admissions originally came following claims reported by Disability News Service (DNS) that police forces had been targeting disabled people taking part in peaceful anti-fracking protests across England.

Read the full article here.

DWP ‘refused reasonable adjustments for community recruits’

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) repeatedly failed to make reasonable adjustments for disabled people who were recruited to build bridges between jobcentres and the local community, it has been claimed.

But the department also appears to be set to discard all the disabled people they recruited from outside the Civil Service when their fixed-term contracts end.

It is feared that none of the scores of Community Partners taken on by DWP to build relationships between jobcentres and local organisations will secure permanent roles when their contracts end at the end of next month.

Read the full article here.

Jodey Whiting: DWP continued to phone woman who took her own life, inquiry finds

he Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) continued to phone and write to a disabled woman who had taken her own life after having her benefits stopped, an independent investigation has found.

The report by the Independent Case Examiner (ICE), Joanna Wallace, concluded that the DWP has no system that immediately alerts all the relevant staff that a claimant of employment and support allowance (ESA) has died.

Because of that failure, DWP continued to phone mum-of-nine Jodey Whiting, and leave voice messages for her, and also wrote to her, after she had taken her own life in February 2017.

Read the full article here.

Jodey Whiting: DWP ignored five ‘safeguarding’ chances before WCA suicide

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) failed five times to follow its own safeguarding rules in the weeks leading up to the suicide of a disabled woman with a long history of mental distress, an independent investigation has found.

The Independent Case Examiner (ICE) concluded that DWP was guilty of “multiple” and “significant” failings in handling the case of mother-of-nine Jodey Whiting (pictured), who had her out-of-work disability benefits stopped for missing a work capability assessment (WCA), and took her own life just 15 days later.

The report is the latest evidence of the institutional failure of DWP to guarantee the safety of disabled people – and particularly those with a history of mental distress – within the “fitness for work” system.

Read the full article here.

Survey on UC for Disabled people and people with long term health conditions

The Disability Benefits Consortium (DBC) has launched a Universal Credit survey so that they can find out more about the experiences of Disabled people and people with long term health conditions

If you have applied for Universal Credit or tried to apply – the DBC want to hear from you.

You can take the online survey here.

The survey should take up to 20 minutes to complete and the results will be completely anonymous. This means your name will not appear in any reports produced by the DBC.

Please share your experiences with Universal Credit and add your voice thousands of other disabled people and people with long-term health conditions so the DBC can lobby the government and campaign for a fairer benefits system.

If you would like the survey in an alternative format or would like to complete it over the phone please contact the DBC here.

The survey closes end of February 2019.

Want to Start a Career in Broadcast Journalism?

Breaking into News is an initiative run by Media Trust, in partnership with ITV News to discover diverse new talent and identify top broadcast journalists of the future.

The competition, now in its eighth year, offers aspiring journalists with limited journalism experience from across England, Wales and Northern Ireland the opportunity to create a local news report with support and advice from experienced journalists working in ten of ITV’s regional newsroom

Disabled people are the most under-represented minority group in broadcasting, according to a provisional report by Diamond, a project set up by the major broadcasters to monitor diversity in the industry. This is why, as members of the ITV West Country Diversity Panel, we would like to strongly encourage our members and any other Disabled people who are interested in a career in broadcast journalism to enter ITV’s Breaking into News competition.

Representation matters; we need Disabled people in the media to tell our stories and highlight the issues that we face. The video below is from one of last year’s winners, Steven Portman, reporting on the barriers Disabled people face when looking for employment.

If you have been dreaming of a career in broadcast journalism and you would like to report on the issues that matter to you, apply here by Friday 5 April 2019.